Supplements for Anxiety and Depression

Stress has become a constant part of modern living. This is unfortunate as sustained stress can significantly increase the risk of health issues including anxiety, insomnia, and even serious neurological disorders such as depression and ADHD. Therefore, limiting the amount of stress in your life may improve quality of life and treatment of these and other stress-related disorders. One of the best ways to reduce stress while supporting other areas of wellness is by supplementing with a product such as HoltraCeuticals’ MaxRelax.

What is MaxRelax?

MaxRelax is a powdered supplement produced by HoltraCeuticals. Its synergistic blend of ingredients promotes sensations of calm, physical relaxation, and a more balanced mood. MaxRelax also supports multiple physiological functions that encourage stress prevention and relief. Incorporating MaxRelax as needed into your daily routine is an excellent way to support neurological wellness, combat stress, and maintain emotional balance. 

What Does MaxRelax Do?

MaxRelax provides several benefits including stress relief, increased focus, better sleep quality, anxiety relief, and mental and physical relaxation. These benefits are facilitated by regulating the activity of neurotransmitters and hormones that dictate mood, stress response, and focus. Unlike most other stress-reducing medications or relaxants, use of MaxRelax is not accompanied by sleepiness or drowsiness. 



What’s in Max Relax?

MaxRelax is formulated with natural ingredients that encourage a healthy response to both mental and physical stress while also supporting neurological activity. Perhaps the most impactful ingredients of MaxRelax are myo-inositol, taurine, and GABA.  

Myo-Inositol

The body uses inositol, more commonly known as Vitamin B8, to store and metabolize amino acids, which are critical in the conversion of food into energy. Research shows that inositol has properties that help ease depression, balance mood, and prevent fatigue. 

There are nine forms of inositol, all of which have minor differences. Myo-inositol specifically is recognized for its ability to improve insulin utilization and hormone balance. Studies suggest that supplementation with myo-inositol may prove to be an effective treatment for neurological issues including schizophrenia, dementia, memory impairment, ADHD, and autism. Furthermore, myo-inositol offers many mood-regulating benefits that may help ease hostility, sadness, and improve overall emotional balance. 

Multiple studies on the effects of myo-inositol have included that supplementing with the powerful pseudovitamin may be an effective stand-alone treatment for depression and panic disorders. These outcomes are possible because myo-inositol helps balance various chemicals throughout the body, including those that impact mood and stress response. 

Taurine

As an amino sulfonic acid, taurine is an essential building block of many proteins used throughout the body. Taurine is the most plentiful of the amino acids and is found in high concentrations in the brain, heart, retina, and blood platelets. One of the primary responsibilities of taurine is regulating the movement of minerals such as calcium, potassium, magnesium, and sodium in and out of cells. Other responsibilities of taurine include:

  • Supporting proper hydration and electrolyte balance for cells
  • Regulating the passage of minerals into and out of cells
  • A necessary component of bile salts, which are essential for digestion
  • Positively influences nervous system function and macular wellness (relating to the eye)
  • Helps maintain healthy immune activity and antioxidant function

Taurine plays an important role in many essential bodily functions such as heart health, cognitive ability, vision and hearing. Therefore, it should not come as a surprise that studies show maintaining optimal levels of taurine is associated with several health benefits including:

  • Improved heart function
  • Better vision
  • Reduced stress and anxiety
  • Greater athletic performance

When functioning properly, the body can produce all the taurine it needs for daily activity. However, if the body cannot maintain appropriate taurine levels, various forms of dysfunction may arise. Supplementing with taurine helps to ensure appropriate levels in the body and protection against deficiency. 

Taurine has neuroprotective qualities that help safeguard brain development, learning ability and memory. A recent study examined the effects of taurine depression-like behaviors relating to hormones, neurotransmitters, inflammatory agents, and neurotrophic factors. The study found that taurine promotes a preventive effect on depression-like behavior in rats with chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Taurine proved effective at limiting chemical factors that contribute to the occurrence of depression. 

GABA (gamma-aminobutyric acid)

Gamma-aminobutyric acid or GABA is a neurotransmitter that plays an essential role in various areas of health. The primary function of GABA, like many neurotransmitters, is to regulate signaling and messaging between the brain and nervous system. Specifically, GABA reduces the activation of nerve cells in the nervous system. Research suggests that this action may be an important deterrent for conditions such as depression, insomnia, ADHD, anxiety, and stress. GABA provides a calming effect that eases sensations of anxiety, fear, and panic. 

Attention disorders such as ADHD and mood disorders like depression are notoriously difficult to treat. Interestingly, recent research suggests that GABA may provide a solution. A study conducted at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine found that children with ADHD had notably reduced levels of GABA when compared to children without attention difficulties. Researchers suggested that increasing intake of GABA on its own or along with typical ADHD treatments may prove exceptionally beneficial for improving attention disorders. Similarly, research shows that individuals with depression frequently have reduced levels of GABA. Interestingly, depression may also suppress GABA levels. Resolving depression may cause an increase of GABA. 

Defend Against Physiological Distress with MaxRelax

Physiological stress can cause an impressive deal of dysfunction including anxiety, insomnia, and chronic conditions like depression and ADHD. Perhaps one of the best ways to ease these issues is by supporting the various neurotransmitters, hormones, and bodily functions that regulate neurological activity. HoltraCeuticals’ MaxRelax contains powerful ingredients such as myo-inositol, taurine, and GABA, which provide notable neurological support. Taking MaxRelax as needed can help ease stress and promote greater physical and mental wellness. Return to physiological serenity and protect your body from excessive stress by supplementing with MaxRelax. 

Resources

1. Gelber D, Levine J, Belmaker RH. “Effect of inositol on bulimia nervosa and binge eating.” Int J Eat Disord. 2001;29(3):345‐348.
2. Benjamin J, Levine J, Fux M, Aviv A, Levy D, Belmaker RH. “Double-blind, placebo-controlled, crossover trial of inositol treatment for panic disorder.” Am J Psychiatry. 1995;152(7):1084‐1086.
3. Palatnik A, Frolov K, Fux M, Benjamin J. “Double-blind, controlled, crossover trial of inositol versus fluvoxamine for the treatment of panic disorder.” J Clin Psychopharmacol. 2001;21(3):335‐339.
4. Levine J, Barak Y, Gonzalves M, et al. “Double-blind, controlled trial of inositol treatment of depression” Am J Psychiatry. 1995;152(5):792‐794.
5. Joseph Levine Mirtha Gonsalves Izak Babur Shaul Stier Avner Elizur Ora Kofman R. H. Belmaker. “Inositol 6 g daily may be effective in depression but not in schizophrenia.” https://doi.org/10.1002/hup.470080109
6. Lydiard RB. “The role of GABA in anxiety disorders.” J Clin Psychiatry. 2003;64 Suppl 3:21‐27.
7. Wu, Gao-Feng et al. “Antidepressant effect of taurine in chronic unpredictable mild stress-induced depressive rats.” Scientific reports vol. 7,1 4989. 10 Jul. 2017.
8. Wei Xi Kong, Si Wei Chen et al. “Effects of taurine on rat behaviors in three anxiety models.” Pharmacology Biochemistry and Behavior, Volume 83, Issue 2, February 2006, Pages 271-276.

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments